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8-K
ALTRIA GROUP, INC. filed this Form 8-K on 02/01/2018
Entire Document
 

Altria Group, Inc. and Subsidiaries
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements
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Plaintiff: Varner
Date:    July 2016

Verdict:
A Broward County jury returned a verdict in favor of plaintiff and against PM USA awarding compensatory damages of $1.5 million and allocating 25% of the fault to PM USA (an amount of $375,000).

Post-Trial Developments:
In July 2016, the trial court entered final judgment in favor of plaintiff with a deduction for plaintiff’s comparative fault. In August 2016, PM USA filed motions to set aside the verdict and for a directed verdict, and plaintiff filed a motion for a new trial. In January 2017, the trial court denied all post-trial motions. In February 2017, PM USA paid the judgment plus interest and associated costs in the amount of approximately $600,000.
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Engle Progeny Appellate Issues: In Douglas, an Engle progeny case against PM USA and R.J. Reynolds, in March 2012, the Florida Second District Court of Appeal issued a decision affirming the judgment of the trial court in favor of the plaintiff and upholding the use of the Engle jury findings with respect to strict liability claims but certified to the Florida Supreme Court the question of whether granting res judicata effect to the Engle jury findings violates defendants’ federal due process rights. In March 2013, the Florida Supreme Court affirmed the final judgment entered in favor of plaintiff upholding the use of the Engle jury findings with respect to strict liability and negligence claims. PM USA’s subsequent petition for writ of certiorari with the United States Supreme Court was unsuccessful.
In Graham, an Engle progeny case against PM USA and R.J. Reynolds, in April 2015, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit found in favor of defendants on the basis of federal preemption, reversing the trial court’s denial of judgment as a matter of law. Thereafter, plaintiff filed a petition for rehearing en banc, which the Eleventh Circuit granted in January 2016. In May 2017, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit rejected defendants’ preemption and due process arguments and affirmed the final judgment entered in plaintiff’s favor. In September 2017, defendants filed a petition for writ of certiorari with the United States Supreme Court on due process and federal preemption grounds, which the court denied in January 2018. In January 2016, in Marotta, a case against R.J. Reynolds on appeal to the Florida Fourth District Court of Appeal, the court rejected R.J. Reynolds’s federal preemption defense, but noted the conflict with Graham and certified the preemption question to the Florida Supreme Court. In March 2016, the Florida Supreme Court accepted review of Marotta and in April 2017, affirmed the Fourth District Court of Appeal’s ruling on preemption.
In Searcy, an Engle progeny case against PM USA and R.J. Reynolds on appeal to the Eleventh Circuit, defendants argued that application of the Engle findings to the Engle progeny plaintiffs’ concealment and conspiracy claims violated defendants’ due process rights. The appeal is pending. In January 2018, the Eleventh Circuit ordered supplemental briefing on the due process issues.
 
In Soffer, an Engle progeny case against R.J. Reynolds, the Florida First District Court of Appeal held that Engle progeny plaintiffs can recover punitive damages only on their intentional tort claims. The Florida Supreme Court accepted jurisdiction over plaintiff’s appeal from the Florida First District Court of Appeal’s decision and, in March 2016, held that Engle progeny plaintiffs can recover punitive damages in connection with all of their claims. Plaintiffs now generally seek punitive damages in connection with all of their claims in Engle progeny cases.
In Schoeff, an Engle progeny case against R.J. Reynolds, the Florida Fourth District Court of Appeal held that comparative fault findings should apply to reduce all compensatory damage awards, including awards based on intentional fraud claims. The Florida Supreme Court accepted jurisdiction over plaintiff’s appeal of the Florida Fourth District Court of Appeal’s decision. In December 2017, the Florida Supreme Court reversed the Court of Appeal’s decision, finding that comparative fault does not reduce compensatory damages awards for intentional torts.

Florida Bond Statute: In June 2009, Florida amended its existing bond cap statute by adding a $200 million bond cap that applies to all state Engle progeny lawsuits in the aggregate and establishes individual bond caps for individual Engle progeny cases in amounts that vary depending on the number of judgments in effect at a given time. Plaintiffs in three state Engle progeny cases against R.J. Reynolds in Alachua County, Florida (Alexander, Townsend and Hall) and one case in Escambia County (Clay) challenged the constitutionality of the bond cap statute. The Florida Attorney General intervened in these cases in defense of the constitutionality of the statute.
Trial court rulings were rendered in Clay, Alexander, Townsend and Hall rejecting the plaintiffs’ bond cap statute challenges in those cases. The plaintiffs unsuccessfully appealed these rulings. In Alexander, Clay and Hall, the District Court of Appeal for the First District of Florida affirmed the trial court decisions and certified the decision in Hall for appeal to the Florida Supreme Court, but declined to certify the question of the constitutionality of the bond cap statute in Clay and Alexander. The Florida Supreme Court granted review of the Hall decision, but, in September 2012, the court dismissed the appeal as moot. In October 2012, the Florida Supreme Court denied the plaintiffs’


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